Thursday, December 01, 2016

'Tidal Fury' Publisher Launch this Sunday!


Dear friends and poetry lovers,

I would be delighted and very happy if you are in Toronto and came out to celebrate this wonderful launch with me on Sunday afternoon in Kensington Market.

The Guernica Editions launch for my book of poetry, Tidal Fury, is this Sunday, December 4, 2016, at the Supermarket Restaurant and Bar, 268 Augusta Avenue, in Kensington Market, from 3:30pm-6pm. Light refreshments are served.

You can see from the flyer that I am launching with some amazing poets and writers. Coming out to the launch will be well worth it. Plus the festive season upon us and there is a slew of great books to consider giving to yourself, family and/or friends!

If you are free on Sunday afternoon, and I hope you are, come and enjoy an afternoon of lovely writing from many authors and help me launch my book with style,

Hope you are all keeping well,
much love,
Brenda
___
Here is a list of the reviews of Tidal Fury so far, including a link to the wonderful video book trailer Gabriel Quigley did for Guernica Editions.


Direct Link: Tidal Fury Video Book Trailer

From the back cover:


She rose, 
a soot-blackened woman, 
from the fine layers of silted taupe ash, 
with scorched feet, 
able to see in all directions. 

Tidal Fury intermeshes styles in narratorial strands. A love story -- he was “a literary device, and then I discovered we knew each other intimately.” An aged narcissist who wields power and invokes a subtext on the social politics of power. A poet whose muse is Medusa. Tidal Fury is a poetry on the edge of the text of an interior ocean of fury and passion. The collection includes artwork from the poet. 

"Tidal Fury is a richly layered, challenging collection by a multi-talented woman. Each line of Tidal Fury shuttles and re-strands a woman immersed in art, culture, mythology who braids and beads words and images in a complex, often erotically-charged conversation with various characters and with the reader, whom she meets “at the edge of the text.” John Oughton, author of Time Slip and Death by Triangulation